Sarah Barnett, a true free spirit at the Sri Chinmoy 3100 mile race.

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SB3Sarah Barnett, 37, from Adelaide has won the world’s longest certified race for the women

Sarah Barnett, 37, from Adelaide has won the world’s longest certified race for the women.

Sarah Barnett, 37, from Adelaide has won the world’s longest certified race for the women in the Self-Transcendence 3100 Mile Race sponsored by the Sri Chinmoy Marathon Team in New York.

In the 18 year history of this race, which the New York Times called “The Mount Everest of Ultrarunning” only two Australians have ever finished the race before and both were men. Sarah is the first Australian female to complete this epic race. Sarah went through 16 pairs of shoes during the race!!!

After 50 days and 3 hours Sarah crossed the finish line nearly 100kms ahead of the two other women (from Russia and Austria) in the race. In a field of the world’s greatest and most accomplished ultra runners on the planet, Sarah’s performance was the second best performance by a female in the 18 year history of the event. She averaged 99.460km per day – this is simply phenomenal.

The 3100 Mile Race is held on a 883 metre course around a school perimeter in Queens, New York. To finish within the 52 day cut off, each runner must run a minimum of 60 miles (96km) a day average, which is 5649 times around the course. They run from 6am to midnight every day.

Sarah is not one of those names in our ultra running circles that springs to mind immediately. She’s quiet, unassuming and goes about her business, yet I’d say she is one of Australia’s most accomplished female multi-day race runner, having won events in Morocco, New York, Sweden and Greece amongst many others. There’s always a point of debate as to where this kind of racing ranks on the scale of ultra running. Is say, a fast 100 miler with plenty of mountains such as Hardrock ‘tougher’ than running 100kms a day for 50 days?

The simple answer is that both disciplines have their place in our sport, and both should be respected for their diversity, which is what makes ultra running awesome in my book. On a personal level, this type of racing is not for me (yet!), but I have the most immense respect for those people who do this type of running. I believe the 3100 to be one of the toughest races on the planet, not just because of the physical undertaking, but the mental focus that’s required for 50 days. Completing this type of event is utterly life changing. You’re encapsulated in a bubble for 50 days, running around a block that becomes your sole focus for a month and a half. Some people may call it crazy, I call it immensely disciplined and astounding.

Second time lucky

For Sarah, this is her second attempt at the race. Last year she entered and covered 2573 miles (4,116kms) within the 52 days. She has been extremely consistent throughout the race averaging 61.70 miles (nearly 99kms per day) and shown tremendous improvement from last year’s attempt.

Sarah comments: “I am so grateful everything has gone well for me in this year’s race. I can’t actually believe it. I have dreamed of finishing this race for so many years. It is the toughest, most challenging, relentless task I have ever tackled. Every day there are so many unimaginable challenges. All of us runners are in this together. There is such a special feeling at this race. There is no room for the ego, we are all here as a one family discovering such strength within ourselves.” – Ultra168.

 

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Good People Run
We love running! With incredible articles, people, events, photography, creativity & running centric news at your fingertips, think of Good People Run™ as your personal & positive concierge for modern running life and culture. Founded by Paul Petch.

About Good People Run

We love running! With incredible articles, people, events, photography, creativity & running centric news at your fingertips, think of Good People Run™ as your personal & positive concierge for modern running life and culture. Founded by Paul Petch.